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Exploding-Wire-Driven Shock Waves

  • G. L. Clark
  • J. J. Hickey
  • R. J. Kingsley
  • R. F. Wuerker

Abstract

The explosion of fine silver wires by the fast discharge of a low-inductance capacitor has been photographed with an STL Model C Image Converter Camera operated as a streak camera. All of the previously observed shock waves and contact surfaces have been clearly recorded [1–3]. In addition, the large effective aperture, f/0.5, of the camera, due to its fast optics, 50: 1 light gain, and 0.5-µsec phosphor persistence, has allowed the initial shock wave in air at atmospheric pressure to be photographed by its own luminosity. Photographs of both radially and circumferentially propagating shock waves, depending upon dwell duration, have been recorded during the second conduction phase of the discharges.

Keywords

Shock Wave Streak Camera Silver Wire Cylindrical Shock Wave Initial Shock Wave 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    W. Müller, Z. Physik Vol. 149, p. 397, 1957.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    F.D. Bennett, Phys. Fluids Vol. 1, p. 347, 1958.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    W.G. Chace and H.K. Moore [eds.], “Exploding Wires,” Vol. 1, Plenum Press, New York, 1959.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    C. A. Rouse, in “Exploding Wires,” Vol. 1, W.G. Chace and H.K. Moore [eds.], Plenum Press, New York, 1959, p. 227.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press New York 1962

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. L. Clark
    • 1
  • J. J. Hickey
    • 1
  • R. J. Kingsley
    • 1
  • R. F. Wuerker
    • 1
  1. 1.Space Technology LaboratoriesLos AngelesUSA

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