Animal Sonar pp 691-701 | Cite as

Cognition and Echolocation of Dolphins

  • Ronald T. Schusterman
Part of the NATO ASI Science book series (NSSA, volume 156)

Abstract

In this conference, we have already been given several examples of sonar hunting bats relying on an internal representation of some past experience as a basis for action. These include experiments demonstrating the predictive tracking of horizontally moving targets by a fishing bat (Campbell & Suthers, this volume) and the extracting of a species-specific concept from acoustical “glint” cues by greater horseshoe bats (von der Emde, this volume). Internal representation involves the encoding of information about specific features of stimuli as well as about relations among stimuli (Schusterman and Krieger, in press).

Keywords

Hunt Fishing Sonar 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald T. Schusterman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Marine SciencesUniv. of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State Univ.HaywardUSA

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