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Animal Sonar pp 613-617 | Cite as

Detection of Prey in Echocluttering Environments

  • G. Neuweiler
  • A. Link
  • G. Marimuthu
  • R. Rübsamen
Part of the NATO ASI Science book series (NSSA, volume 156)

Abstract

Echolocating bat species foraging above canopies will face no severe difficulties in detecting flying insects. Bats foraging close to vegetations, over the ground or water surfaces, have to detect their prey within a clutter of time-smeared echoes reflected from foliages, grass, etc. By field observations, behavioural and neurophysiological investigations we have studied how two different groups of bats detect prey in echo cluttering environments: the gleaning bat, Megaderma lyra and three rhinolophoid species, Rhinolophus rouxi, Hipposideros speoris and Hipposideros bicolor which forage insects close to and within vegetation.

Keywords

Wing Beat Prey Detection Pure Tone Signal Doppler Shift Compensation Multiunit Recording 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Habersetzer J, Schuller G, Neuweiler G (1984) Foraging behavior and Doppler shift compensation in echolocating hipposiderid bats, Hipposideros bicolor and Hipposideros speoris. J Comp Physiol 155: 559–567.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Neuweiler
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Link
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Marimuthu
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Rübsamen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Zoologisches InstitutUniversität MünchenMünchen 2Germany
  2. 2.Department of Animal Behaviour, School of Biological SciencesMadurai Kamaraj UniversityMaduraiIndia

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