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Animal Sonar pp 501-506 | Cite as

Predictive Tracking of Horizontally Moving Targets by the Fishing Bat, Noctilio Leporinus

  • Karen A. Campbell
  • Roderick A. Suthers
Part of the NATO ASI Science book series (NSSA, volume 156)

Abstract

Bats hunting by sonar do not receive continuous target information; rather, the echo from each sonar pulse provides an acoustic bulletin by which they update their current perception of target range and position. This suggests that a hunting bat might keep track of moving prey by two general techniques. It might simply fly toward the last known position of the target (a non-predictive tracking strategy), or.t could somehow predict the target’s trajectory on the basis of known target parameters such as velocity, acceleration and position at.the time of the most recent echo (a predictive strategy).

Keywords

Pulse Repetition Rate Target Movement Target Speed Tracking Strategy Sonar Pulse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Bloedel, P., 1955, Hunting methods of fish-catching bats, particularly Noctilio leporinus, J. Mammal. 36: 390–399.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Masters, W.M., Moffat, A.M.J., and Simmons, J., 1985, Sonar tracking of horizontally moving targets by the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus, Science, 228: 1331–1333.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Suthers, R.A., 1965, Acoustic orientation by fish-catching bats,J. Exp. Zool., 158: 319–348.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Wenstrup, J.J., and Suthers, RA., 1984, Echolocation of moving targets by-the fish catching bat, Noctilio leporinus, J. Comp. Physiol. A., 155: 75–89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen A. Campbell
    • 1
  • Roderick A. Suthers
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Medicine and Department of BiologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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