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Recent Topics of μSR Studies on High-Tc Systems

  • Y. J. Uemura
  • G. M. Luke
  • B. J. Sternlieb
  • L. P. Le
  • J. H. Brewer
  • R. Kadono
  • R. F. Kiefl
  • S. R. Kreitzman
  • T. M. Riseman
  • C. L. Seaman
  • J. J. Neumeier
  • Y. Dalichaouch
  • M. B. Maple
  • G. Saito
  • H. Yamochi
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 246)

Abstract

History of the muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements dates back to the late 1950’s and 60’s following the discovery of parity violation. The application of μSR to condensed matter physics has steadily developed1 in the 70′s and early 80′s; mainly in the study of magnetic properties of ferro- or antiferromagnets and spin glasses. Extensive μSR studies on high-Tc systems2–4 have increased the recognition of this technique as one of the very powerful experimental methods in the study of magnetism and superconductivity.

Keywords

Carrier Density Spin Glass Spin Fluctuation Muon Spin Magnetic Phase Diagram 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. J. Uemura
    • 1
  • G. M. Luke
    • 1
  • B. J. Sternlieb
    • 1
  • L. P. Le
    • 1
  • J. H. Brewer
    • 2
  • R. Kadono
    • 2
  • R. F. Kiefl
    • 2
  • S. R. Kreitzman
    • 2
  • T. M. Riseman
    • 2
  • C. L. Seaman
    • 3
  • J. J. Neumeier
    • 3
  • Y. Dalichaouch
    • 3
  • M. B. Maple
    • 3
  • G. Saito
    • 4
  • H. Yamochi
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsColumbia UniversityNew York CityUSA
  2. 2.TRIUMF and Department of PhysicsUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Department of PhysicsUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA
  4. 4.Institute for Solid State PhysicsUniversity of TokyoRoppongi, Minato-Ku, Tokyo 106Japan

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