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Sliding Anvil High Pressure Apparatus: Description, Performance, Ability to Measure very Small Changes of Volume and Application to the Determination of the Volume Change of Cerium at about 51 Kbar and 20°C

  • R. Epain
  • G. Bocquillon
  • A. Frelat
  • C. Loriers-Susse
  • B. Vodar
  • H. Merx
  • C. Moussin

Abstract

Very high pressures can be obtained through the use of multi-anvil devices with compressible gaskets [1]. Unfortunately, due to the extrusion of the gaskets, the maximum pressures that can be reached with these devices are roughly inversely proportional to the initial working volume of the cell. For a cubic device, for instance, if h is the initial value of the cube edge (see Fig. 1) the maximum pressure is an increasing function of Δh/h. If one wants to increase Δh, in order to increase the pressure, the thickness of the gasket must also be increased. But since this accelerates the extrusion, the only possible way of achieving higher pressures consists in reducing h, that is in reducing the initial volume.

Keywords

Maximum Pressure PTFE Film Hill Book Company Pressure Calibration Cube Edge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Epain
    • 1
  • G. Bocquillon
    • 1
  • A. Frelat
    • 1
  • C. Loriers-Susse
    • 1
  • B. Vodar
    • 2
  • H. Merx
    • 3
  • C. Moussin
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratoires de Bellevue, C.N.R.S.MeudonFrance
  2. 2.Centre Universitaire Paris NordVilletaneuseFrance
  3. 3.Centre d’Etudes de Bruyères-le-ChâtelParisFrance

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