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Explosive Welding: Applications and Techniques

  • D. R. Hay

Abstract

It is conceivable that explosive welds first appeared sometime after the 1880’s when high-velocity gunnery was introduced and projectiles impinged on metal targets. In spite of some early experiments [1,2] in the 1940’s, such as Lavrentiev’s work in 1947, countless explosive-metal experiments in the post World War II period resulted in unintentional bonding which was not then recognized for its full potential. The next reports mentioning explosive bonding appeared in 1958 [3,4], while the next work reported in the open literature was in 1959 [5]. A patent disclosure was filed on this subject in 1960 [6]. Thus it was not until the late 1950’s that explosive bonding, per se, came into being. Since that time a variety of metals have been successfully bonded.

Keywords

Detonation Velocity Collision Point Explosive Welding Plate Velocity NATO Advance Study Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. R. Hay
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre de Développement TechnologiqueMontréalCanada

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