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Extrusion Pressure Vs. Extrusion Ratio Relation for the Hydrostatic Extrusion of Solid Polymers

  • N. Inoue
  • T. Nakayama
  • M. Shimono

Abstract

Ten engineering polymers, crystalline or amorphous, were hydrostatically extruded in castor oil at pressures up to 4 kbars without heating the pressure vessel [1]. The polymers studied included polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon 6, polyoxymethylene, polyvinyl chloride, acryronitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, polymethyl methacrylate, polycarbonate, polystyrene, and epoxy. The extrusion ratios studied ranged from 1.2 to 10.0. A linear relationship was experimentally established between the extrusion pressure and extrusion ratio within a certain limit of the latter. In addition, it was experimentally proved that the cross-sectional planes remained planes during the extrusion process when the reduction ratio was not very large [2].

Keywords

Polymethyl Methacrylate Extrusion Ratio Extrusion Pressure Glass Transition Point Hydrostatic Extrusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Inoue
    • 1
  • T. Nakayama
    • 1
  • M. Shimono
    • 2
  1. 1.Science University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Nippon Steel CorporationTokyoJapan

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