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Computer Simulation of Fracture in Small Scale Borehole Experiments in Oil Shale

  • W. J. Murri
  • D. R. Curran
  • D. A. Shockey
  • L. Seaman
  • R. E. Tokheim
  • S. L. McHugh
  • C. Young

Abstract

The Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), with support from the Bureau of Mines and the U.S. Geological Survey, has begun to develop technologies that can make untapped fossil fuel reserves economically extractible. As part of this ERDA program, Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque (SLA), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), and the Laramie Energy Research Center, Laramie, Wyoming, have initiated in situ shale oil recovery programs. An important objective of these programs is to develop techniques for the in situ fracturing of oil shale to provide increased permeability and allow conversion of the shale kerogen to shale oil by appropriate thermal processing. This objective requires a quantitative understanding and description of the fracture and fragmentation of oil shale.

Keywords

Crack Size Crack Density Crack Pattern Radial Crack Crack Radius 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. J. Murri
    • 1
  • D. R. Curran
    • 1
  • D. A. Shockey
    • 1
  • L. Seaman
    • 1
  • R. E. Tokheim
    • 1
  • S. L. McHugh
    • 1
  • C. Young
    • 1
  1. 1.SRI InternationalMenlo ParkUSA

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