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High-Pressure Water Jet Applications in Drilling Operations

  • T. J. Labus

Abstract

High-pressure water jets have been investigated for applications over a wide range of activites related to mining and excavation technology. One area that is receiving considerable attention is the drilling operations for primary and secondary resource recovery. Investigations have been performed using high-pressure water-jet drills for oil-well drilling that have indicated drilling rates of two to three times those of conventional roller bits, and potential significant savings in drilling costs, especially for deep land wells, offshore wells, or arctic wells [1,2]. For small hole drilling such as blast holes, anchors and roof bolting, hybrid systems of mechanical cutters and water jets are currently being investigated. Test results with a water-jet augmented drill on granite have reported an increase in the drilling rate of five times over that of standard rock drills [3]. For geothermal drilling operations, the combination of jet cutting and thermal fracturing can substantially increase the drilling rate over conventional systems. A wide variety of materials can be drilled using jet cutting including limestone, sandstone, granite, taconite, oil shale, and tar sands.

Keywords

Drilling Rate Standoff Distance Drilling Operation Blast Hole Roof Bolting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. J. Labus
    • 1
  1. 1.Scire CorporationDowners GroveUSA

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