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Use of Heavy-Oil Recycle to Reduce Operating Pressure for Non-Fouling Operation in Thermal Hydrocracking

  • C. P. Khulbe
  • B. B. Pruden
  • J. M. Denis

Abstract

Tar-sand bitumen from the Athabasca deposit in Canada contains about 51 wt .% pitch (fraction boiling above 524°C). It is necessary to convert pitch to obtain better yields of distillable hydrocarbons (fraction boiling below 524°C). Different processes such as delayed coking, fluid coking, and flexicoking have been developed for the first-stage refining of heavy oil and bitumens, but the maximum yield of distillate from these processes is only 76 wt.% [1,2] and high amounts of undesirable coke are formed as a by-product. A thermal hydrocracking process [3] capable of competing with these methods for heavy-oil processing has been developed. Depending on the operating conditions, the thermal hydrocracking could give a distillate yield of over 86 wt .%.

Keywords

Reactor Fluid Coke Deposition Average Residence Time Liquid Hourly Space Velocity Distillate Yield 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. P. Khulbe
    • 1
  • B. B. Pruden
    • 1
  • J. M. Denis
    • 1
  1. 1.Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy TechnologyOttawaCanada

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