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Vasopeptides pp 417-434 | Cite as

Acid Dependent Kinin-Forming System in Mammalian Malignant and Normal Tissue

  • Nathan Back
  • Robert Steger
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 21)

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that a mammalian tumor (Murphy-Sturm lymphosarcoma) contains the following components of a vasoactive kinin-forming system: kininogen, a kinin-destroying enzyme, and a pre-kallikrein proenzyme capable of being activated by acetone (1). Levels of kininogen increased during tumor development as did kininase activity. Acetone-precipitated tumor extracts formed kinin when incubated with heated (80°C rat) or human plasma. This kinin-forming activity initially increased during tumor growth and then diminished to almost zero levels within 12–14 days following tumor transplant. The kallikrein activity was similar to that of rat plasma kallikrein with respect to pH profile, kinetics of kinin formation (using human plasma kininogen as substrate at pH 7.8), and action of plant, mammalian, and synthetic protease inhibitors.

Keywords

Acid Proteinase Kinin Activity Tumor Extract Epsilon Amino Caproic Acid Bean Trypsin Inhibitor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathan Back
    • 1
  • Robert Steger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemical Pharmacology School of PharmacyState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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