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Vasopeptides pp 289-296 | Cite as

Rat Intestinal Kallikrein

  • I. J. Zeitlin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 21)

Abstract

Aqueous extracts of mammalian gut wall were shown by Werle and his colleagues (1960) to contain a trypsin-activated hypo-:tensive activity. They called this activity a kallikrein although they presented no direct evidence that kinin release was involved. Ammdsen and Nustad (1965) noted that simple saline extracts from intestinal activity. They called this activity a kallikrein although they presented no direct evidence that kinin release was involved. Amundsen and mucosae of rats and rabbits released a smooth muscle stimulant from treated human plasma. However, they did not characterize either the smooth muscle stimulant or the nature of its release. In a recent review, Webster (1970) has suggested that the activities involved in these two studies were not, in fact, kallikreins, but other “endogenous proteases”.

Keywords

Esterase Activity Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor Tissue Kallikrein Endogenous Protease Plasma Kallikrein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. J. Zeitlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Wolfson Gastrointestinal Laboratories, Gastrointestinal UnitWestern General HospitalEdinburghUK

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