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A Versatile and Sensitive Method for Measuring Oxygen

  • D. F. Wilson
  • J. M. Vanderkooi
  • T. J. Green
  • G. Maniara
  • S. P. Defeo
  • D. C. Bloomgarden
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 215)

Summary

Oxygen dependence of the lifetime of the excited triplet state of phosphorescent molecules can be used to measure the oxygen concentration in aqueous media. These measurements are insensitive to much of the optical interference that limits the usefulness of measurements based on the oxygen dependent quenching of luminescence intensity. The measurements also extend to significantly lower oxygen concentrations than are normally attainable using oxygen electrodes. The phosphorescence lifetimes can be accurately measured from a few microseconds to seconds, permitting a wide dynamic range of oxygen concentration measurements. With currently available probes, for example, it is possible to make continuous measurement of oxygen concentrations from 10−4 M to 10−8 M in a single experiment.

Keywords

Oxygen Concentration Luminescence Intensity Light Flash Direct Memory Access Exciting Light 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. F. Wilson
    • 1
  • J. M. Vanderkooi
    • 1
  • T. J. Green
    • 1
  • G. Maniara
    • 1
  • S. P. Defeo
    • 1
  • D. C. Bloomgarden
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Medical SchoolUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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