Advertisement

Tumour Blood Flow Following Local Ultrasound Heating Computed from Thermal Clearance Curves

  • R. D. Braun
  • T. K. Goldstick
  • M. Kluge
  • F. Kallinowski
  • P. Vaupel
  • S. C. George
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 215)

Summary

Thermal clearance curves following termination of ultrasound-induced hyperthermia in human mammary carcinomas implanted into the flanks of nude rats were studied. They were found to be monoexponential in form, both with and without blood flow. From the difference between the inverse time constants with and without flow, the tumour blood flow rate could be calculated. Blood flow was found to increase with very short exposure times at the therapeutic hyperthermia temperature and subsequently decrease as the exposure time increased. A higher therapeutic hyperthermia temperature augmented this effect.

Keywords

Oxygen Transport Phantom Experiment Tumour Blood Flow Strip Chart Record Localize Hyperthermia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Braun, R.D. (1986). Determination of tumor blood flow by thermal washout. M.S. thesis, Chemical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  2. Dethlefsen, L.A. and Dewey, W.C. (1982). Cancer therapy by hyperthermia, drugs and radiation. Bethesda National Cancer Institute Monograph, 61.Google Scholar
  3. Emami, B. and Song, C.W. (1984). Physiological mechanisms in hyperthermia: a review. Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 10, 289–295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Hahn, G.M. (1982). Hyperthermia and Cancer. Plenum Press, New York and London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Jain, R.K. and Ward-Hartley, K. (1984). Tumor blood flow characterization, modifications, and role in hyperthermia. IEEE Trans. Sonics Ultrasonics, 31, 504–526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Mueller-Klieser, W. and Vaupel, P. (1984). Effect of hyperthermia on tumor blood flow. Biorheology, 21, 529–538.Google Scholar
  7. Mueller-Schauenburg, W., Apfel, H., Benzing, H. and Betz, E. (1975). Quantitative measurement of local blood flow with heat clearance. Basic Research in Cardiology, 70, 547–567.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Song, C.W. (1984). Effect of local hyperthermia on blood flow and microenvironment. Cancer Res. 44, Suppl, 4721s-4730s.Google Scholar
  9. Storm, F.K. (1983). Hyperthermia in Cancer Therapy. Hall Publishers, Boston.Google Scholar
  10. Vaupel, P. (1975). Interrelationship between mean arterial pressure, blood flow, and vascular resistance in solid tumor tissue of the DS-carcinosarcoma. Experientia, 31, 587–588.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Vaupel, P. and Kallinowski, F. (1986). Physiological effects of hyperthermia. Recent Results in Cancer Research (in press).Google Scholar
  12. Vaupel, P., Kallinowski, F., Dave S., Gabbert, H. and Hastert, G. (1985). Human mammary carcinomas in nude rats-A new approach for investigating oxygen transport and substrate utilization in tumor tissues. In: Oxygen Transport to Tissue-VII. Eds Kreuzer, F., Cain, S.M., Turek, Z. and Goldstick, T.K., Plenum Press, New York and London, ( Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 191, 737–751 ).Google Scholar
  13. Vaupel, P., Mueller-Klieser, W., Otte, J. and Manz, R. (1984). Impact of various thermal doses on the oxygenation and blood flow in malignant tumors upon localized hyperthermia. In: Oxygen Transport to Tissue-V. Eds Lubbers, D.W., Acker, H., Leniger-Follert, E. and Goldstick, T.K., Plenum Press, New York and London, ( Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 169, 621–629 ).Google Scholar
  14. Vaupel, P., Ostheimer, K. and Mueller-Klieser, W. (1980). Circulatory and metabolic responses of malignant tumors during localized hyperthermia. J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol. 98, 15–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Braun
    • 1
  • T. K. Goldstick
    • 1
  • M. Kluge
    • 2
  • F. Kallinowski
    • 2
  • P. Vaupel
    • 2
  • S. C. George
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Engineering DepartmentNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Applied PhysiologyUniversity of MainzMainzGermany

Personalised recommendations