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Acute Respiratory Failure Induced by Tracheal Instillation of Xanthine Oxidase, its Prevention and Therapy by Exogenous Surfactant Instillation

  • B. Lachmann
  • O. D. Saugstad
  • J. Klein
  • W. Erdmann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 215)

Abstract

Free oxygen radicals play an important role in a variety of diseases. The hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system, which generates the superoxide radical, exerts a damaging effect on several organs, including the lung (Review: Saugstad 1985). It has been shown that intravenous hypoxanthine in rats breathing 100% oxygen can cause lung damage, in contrast to hypoxanthine or oxygen alone (Saugstad et al., 1984a). Further, it has been shown (Johnson et al., 1981) that this system acutely induces increased capillary permeability in the rat lung. We have demonstrated that xanthine oxidase (XO) applied to the trachea of guinea-pigs induces dramatic changes in lung-thorax compliance, in the course of a few minutes, by destroying the functional integrity of the bronchial and alveolar surfactant system, probably by formation of free oxygen radicals (FOR). This effect could be partly prevented by superoxide dismutase (SOD) which is a superoxide radical scavenger (Saugstad et al., 1984b). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to influence the functional changes induced by FOR by tracheal instillation of natural surfactant (NS).

Keywords

Xanthine Oxidase Free Oxygen Radical Superoxide Radical Scavenger Pentobarbitone Sodium Natural Surfactant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Lachmann
    • 1
  • O. D. Saugstad
    • 2
  • J. Klein
    • 1
  • W. Erdmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnaesthesiaErasmus University RotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsNational Hospital NorwayOsloNorway

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