Advertisement

Adaptation to Hypoxia

  • I. S. Longmuir
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 215)

Summary

Many biochemical changes occur during acclimation to altitude. Some appear to be deleterious, but the increase in cytochrome-P 450 and the changes in the endoplasmic reticulum seem to be beneficial. The latter changes could reduce the capillary to oxidase gradient to compensate for the lower capillary oxygen tensions. The possibility of accelerating acclimation to hypoxia by using drugs which produce similar changes is being explored.

Keywords

Oxygen Tension Oxygen Transport Oxygen Carrier Oxygen Capacity Oxyhaemoglobin Dissociation Curve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Betts, W. and Longmuir, I.S. (1986). Effect of hypoxia on endoplasmic reticulum in mouse liver. Oxygen Transport to Tissue-VIII. Ed. Longmuir, I.S., Plenum Press, New York and London, ( Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 200, 425–427 ).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Betts, W. and Longmuir, I.S. (1987). Changes in the endoplasmic reticulum following exposure to hypoxia. This volume.Google Scholar
  3. Cerretelli, P. (1976). Limiting factors to oxygen transport on Mount Everest. J. Appl. Physiol. 40, 658–667.Google Scholar
  4. Hurtado, A. (1964). Animals in high altitudes: resident man. In: Handbook of Physiology, Section 4, Adaptation to the Environment. Eds Dill, D.B., Adolph, E.F. and Wilber, C.G., American Physiological Society, Washington, D.C., pp. 843–859.Google Scholar
  5. Krogh, A.S. (1919). The rate of diffusion of oxygen through animal tissues, with some remarks on the coefficient of invasion. J. Physiol. 52, 391–408.Google Scholar
  6. Longmuir, I.S. (1954). The respiration rate of bacteria as a function of oxygen concentration. Biochem. J. 57, 81–87.Google Scholar
  7. Longmuir, I.S. (1977). Search for alternative oxygen carriers. In: Oxygen and Physiological Functions, Ed. Jobsis, F. Professional Information Library, Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  8. Longmuir, I.S., and Bourke, A. (1960). The measurement of the diffusion of oxygen through respiring tissue. Biochem. J. 76, 225–229.Google Scholar
  9. Longmuir, I.S. and McCabe, M.G.P. (1964). Evidence for an oxygen carrier in tissue. J. Polarograph. Soc. x, 45–48.Google Scholar
  10. Longmuir, I.S. and McCabe, M.G.P. (1965). Tissue adaptation to oxygen lack. J. Theoret. Biol. 8, 124–129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Longmuir, I.S. and Pashko, L. (1977). The role of facilitated diffusion of oxygen in tissue hypoxia. Int.J. Biometeor. 27, 179–187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Longmuir, I.S., Young, A. and Mailman, R. (1978). Induction by hypoxia of a new haemoglobin-like pigment. In: Oxygen Transport to Tissue-III. Eds Silver, I.A., Erecinska, M. and Bicher, H.I., Plenum Press, New York and London, ( Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 94, 297–300 ).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. McCabe, M.G.P. (1964). Tissue respiration and anaesthetics. Ph.D. Thesis, University of London, U.K.Google Scholar
  14. Moore, R.E. (1956). Response of new-born kittens to hypoxia. J. Physiol. 133, 60–70.Google Scholar
  15. Robin, E.D. (1980). Amberson Lecture. Amer. Rev. Resp. Dis. 121. 774.Google Scholar
  16. Torrance, J.D., Lenfant, C., Cruz, J. and Marticorena, E. (1971). Oxygen transport mechanisms in residents at high altitude. Respir. Physiol. 11, 1–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Turek, Z., Kreuzer, F. and Hoofd, L.J.C. (1973). Advantage or disadvantage of a decrease of blood oxygen affinity for tissue oxygen supply at hypoxia: a theoretical study comparing man and rat. Pflugers Arch. 342, 185–197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Vanderkooc, J. and Callis, J.B. (1974). Pyrene. A probe of lateral diffusion in the hydrophobic region of membranes. Biochemistry, 13, 4000–4006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. West, J.B. (1982). American Medical Research Expedition to Everest. Physiologist, 25, 36–38.Google Scholar
  20. Young, A.J. (1977). Facilitated diffusion of oxygen in tissue. Ph.D. Thesis, North Carolina State University, U.S.A.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. S. Longmuir
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

Personalised recommendations