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Dynamic Aspect of Excited-State Photoelectron Spectroscopy: Some Small Molecules

  • Katsumi Kimura

Abstract

During the last two decades, photoelectron spectroscopy with a Hel (58.4 nm) resonance lamp or other vacuum UV sources has been extensively applied to a variety of molecules in the gas phase. Such photoelectron spectroscopy gives us valuable data on the ionic states which are produced by single-photon ionization of molecules in their ground state.1–3

Keywords

Photoelectron Spectrum Rydberg State Resonant Ionization Stepwise Ionization Vibrational Progression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katsumi Kimura
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Molecular ScienceOkazaki 444Japan

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