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Determination of Coefficients in Reservoir Simulation

  • Richard E. Ewing
Part of the Progress in Scientific Computing book series (PSC, volume 2)

Abstract

The process of determining unknown parameter values, such as porosity and permeability, which are used in a mathematical reservoir model to give the best fit to measured well production history is commonly called “history matching.” Theoretically, one would like to have an automatic routine for history matching which is applicable to simulators of varying complexity and which can determine a set of parameters giving a good history match with a reasonable amount of computational time and effort. In this paper we shall survey and compare some of the methods proposed in the literature for automated history matching, emphasizing the inherent difficulties which must be addressed, and indicating some possible future directions for research in this area.

Keywords

Well Bore Production Well Sensitivity Coefficient History Match Grid Block 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1983

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  • Richard E. Ewing

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