The Use of Optical Fibers in Biomedical Sensing

  • A. G. Mignani
  • A. M. Scheggi
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 252)


The use of optical fibers in biomedical instrumentation goes back to the 1960s, when thousands of thin glass fibers were successfully assembled in flexible bundles, for imaging hidden areas of the human body. Some fibroscopes were further provided with an ancillary channel, so as to make possible power-laser cavitational-surgery and therapy using large-core optical fibers as a delivery system. In addition to this fiber-based instrumentation, attention has also been given to sensors for monitoring biological functions by means of optical fibers.


Fiber Optic Bundle Stainless Steel Capillary Light Intensity Modulation Fiberoptic Sensor Glass Microcapillary 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Mignani
    • 1
  • A. M. Scheggi
    • 1
  1. 1.IROE - CNRFirenzeItaly

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