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Interactions of Estrogenic Pesticides with Cytochrome P450

  • David Kupfer
Part of the NATO ASI Series Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 202)

Abstract

This presentation examines a variety of questions concerning the interactions of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides with cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. In particular, it intends to discuss those pesticides which exhibit estrogenic activity in mammals. An important question concerns whether the estrogenic activity of these pesticides resides in the parent compound or whether estrogenicity of these compounds is primarily due to their respective metabolites. In the latter case, it is anticipated that the alteration in the activity of the enzymes catalyzing the formation of these metabolites would have a pronounced effect on the estrogenic activity of the parent compound. Hence it would be important to identify the enzymes (P450s) catalyzing their formation. These aspects will be examined in some detail.

Keywords

Estrogen Receptor Liver Microsome Reactive Intermediate Estrogenic Activity Covalent Binding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Kupfer
    • 1
  1. 1.Worcester Foundation for Experimental BiologyShrewsburyUSA

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