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Ureaplasma Urealyticum and Renal Stones

  • H. Hedelin
  • J.-E. Brorson
  • L. Grenabo
  • S. Pettersson

Abstract

Urease-producing bacteria, such as Proteus mirabilis, can be detected in the urinary tract of most patients with infection stones (struvite and carbonate apatite stones). Bacteria, however, can not always be demonstrated in the urine samples of the stones from these patients. Ureaplasma urealyticum is a small urease-producing microorganism that differs from bacteria by the lack of a cell wall. It is not recovered by ordinary bacterial culture techniques and special methods are required for its isolation and identification. U. urealyticum is cultured from the urethra in about half of all sexually active adults1,2. It has also been isolated, with a much lower frequency, from urine obtained by suprapubic bladder punctures but not at all from the upper urinary tract3,4. It is one of the causes of nongonococcal urethritis and it may induce chronic cystitis in patients with a hypogammaglobulinaemia. It has not yet been connected, however, to any upper urinary tract disease. U. urealyticum does not synthesize folic acid and it is thus resistant to penicillins, cephalosporins and sulphonamides as well as other antimicrobial agents which act by interfering with cell wall formation or folic acid synthesis. U. urealyticum has been shown to produce bladder stones in rats5,6 and to promote crystallization of struvite and calcium phosphate in synthetic urine7. In a preliminary study, its role has been demonstrated in the development of urinary tract concrements in humans8. To elucidate further this question, we have performed an extended clinical study.

Keywords

Urinary Tract Calcium Oxalate Renal Stone Ureaplasma Urealyticum Magnesium Ammonium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Hedelin
    • 1
  • J.-E. Brorson
    • 1
  • L. Grenabo
    • 1
  • S. Pettersson
    • 1
  1. 1.Depts. of Urology and MicrobiologySahlgrenska SjukhusetGöteborgSweden

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