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Urinary Excretion Pattern of Main Glycosaminoglycans in Stone Formers and Controls

  • A. Martelli
  • B. Marchesini
  • P. Buli
  • F. Lambertini
  • R. Rusconi

Abstract

Various inhibitors of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal growth and aggregation have been found in human urine. These findings led to the hypothesis that a deficiency of these substances may be involved in the generation of kidney stones. Among them, the urinary macromolecules, glycosaminoglycans (GAG), have been proved to be effective inhibitors of crystallization in vitro1. Several investigators have compared total GAG excretion of stone-forming subjects to that of normal controls but the results have been conflicting2−4. It should be emphasized that urinary GAGS are extremely heterogeneous with respect to molecular weight and charge density and the possibility exists that a selection of different GAG fractions has been obtained in different studies. We thus examined a GAG fraction characterized by less complete degradation in terms of both its uronic acid content and the relative distribution of its main components, chondroitin sulfate (ChS) and heparan sulfate (HS), in stone formers and normals.

Keywords

Heparan Sulfate Chondroitin Sulfate Calcium Oxalate Uronic Acid Content CaOx Stone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Martelli
    • 1
  • B. Marchesini
    • 1
  • P. Buli
    • 1
  • F. Lambertini
    • 1
  • R. Rusconi
    • 1
  1. 1.Depts. of Clinical Pharmacology and UrologyUniversity of BolognaItaly

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