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Relation Between Hypercalciuria and Vitamin D3-Status in Renal Stone Formers

  • T. Berlin
  • I. Björkhem
  • L. Collste
  • I. Holmberg
  • H. Wijkström
Conference paper

Abstract

An increased urinary excretion of calcium is common among patients with recurrent urolithiasis. Another common abnormality is a low-normal or subnormal serum phosphate level, the latter being a stimulus for the renal conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D3) into the most active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3.) Increased serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2 D3 have been demonstrated in renal stone formers 3 and in patients with hypercalciuria4. The major circulating form of vitamin D3 is, however, 25-(OH) D3 and this metabolite is believed to reflect best the endogenous synthesis and stores of vitamin D3 5. Previous attempts to demonstrate increased concentrations of 25-(OH) D3 in serum from patients who form renal stones have failed2,3. Whether or not the pool of 25-OH D3 is increased in hypercalciuria is not known. In order to study this possibility, we have determined 25-OH D3 in stone forming patient with or without hypercalciuria.

Keywords

Renal Stone Serum Phosphate Calcium Excretion Lower Serum Phosphate Huddinge Hospital 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Berlin
    • 1
  • I. Björkhem
    • 1
  • L. Collste
    • 1
  • I. Holmberg
    • 1
  • H. Wijkström
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Urology and Clinical ChemistryKarolinska Institute, Huddinge HospitalHuddingeSweden

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