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Intestinal Absorption of Calcium: Basic Aspects

  • F. Bronner
Conference paper

Abstract

Intestinal calcium absorption is the resultant of two types of movement: peristaltic movement by the chyme from stomach to colon and movement across the epithelium of solubilized calcium all along the intestine. Transepithelial movement in turn involved two processes: (i) a saturable process that requires metabolic energy and by which calcium is moved across the mucosal cell, and (ii) a concentration-dependent, non-saturable process that does not appear regulated. The saturable process is encountered in the proximal portion of the intestine, mostly the duodenum. The non-saturable process prevails throughout the intestine. Thus, in the duodenum and upper jejunum calcium moves transepithelially by a combination of saturable and non-saturable processes, in the lower jejunum and ileum, calcium moves across the epithelium largely by the nonsaturable, concentration-dependent process1−4.

Keywords

Calcium Absorption Saturable Process Intestinal Calcium Absorption Saturable Component Lower Jejunum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Bronner
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Oral BiologyUniversity of Connecticut Health CenterFarmingtonUSA

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