Advertisement

Tea Drinking — A Risk Factor for Urolithiasis?

  • D. N. Churchill
  • J. Morgan
  • M. H. Gault

Abstract

A small increase in urinary oxalate concentration produces a considerable increase in supersaturation with respect to calcium oxalate1. Although dietary oxalate is responsible for only 10–15% of total urinary oxalate2, ingestion of oxalate-rich foods (e.g. rhubarb, spinach, chocolate) causes a marked increase in urinary oxalate excretion3. Tea, a major source of oxalate, is a popular beverage and, therefore, could be a clinically important risk factor for calcium oxalate urolithiasis. We have used a case control design to estimate this risk.

Keywords

Oxalic Acid Calcium Oxalate Case Control Design Urinary Oxalate Calcium Oxalate Stone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    W. G. Robertson and M. Peacock, Nephron 26:105 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. Hodgkinson, “Oxalic Acid in Biology and Medicine”, Academic Press, London (1977).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    A. Strenge, A. Hesse, D. Bach, and W. Vahlensieck, in: “Urolithiasis, Clinical and Basic Research”, L. H. Smith, W. G. Robertson, and B. Finlayson, eds., Plenum, New York (1981).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    D. N. Churchill, C. M. Maloney, J. Bear, D. G. Bryant, G. Fodor, and M. H. Gault, J. Chron. Dis. 33:727 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    J. L. Fleiss and B. S. Everitt, Br. J. Math. Stat. Psychol. 24:117 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J. Fraser and D. J. Campbell, Clin. Biochem. 5:99 (1972).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. N. Churchill
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Morgan
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. H. Gault
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Health SciencesMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.Memorial University St John’sNewfoundlandCanada

Personalised recommendations