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Natural Inhibitors of Formation and Dissolution of Stone Minerals

  • A. Lanzalaco
  • M. Coyle
  • S. Gaur
  • T. P. Binette
  • T. S. Herman
  • G. Sufrin
  • G. H. Nancollas

Abstract

In assessing the inhibitory activity of urine, seeded COM mineralization experiments are usually made in the presence of high urine dilutions (typically 100-fold) but there is some question as to whether these results can be extrapolated to in vivo conditions1,2. In our laboratory, by using a calcium-specific ion electrode protected from the poisoning effects of urinary macromolecules by means of a dialysis membrane, it is now possible to measure rates of mineralization and demineralization of stone components in whole urines with a precision hitherto unattainable.

Keywords

Calcium Oxalate Calcium Oxalate Stone Total Calcium Concentration Free Ionic Concentration Stone Mineral 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    M. B. Rose, Invest. Urol. 12:428 (1975).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    B. Finlayson, in: “Calcium Metabolism in Renal Failure and Nephrolithiasis”, D. S. David, ed., Wiley, New York (1977).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D. J. White, J. Christoffersen, T. S. Herman, A. C. Lanzalaco, and G. H. Nancollas, J. Urol. 129:175 (1983).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    B. B. Tomazic and G. H. Nancollas, J. Urol. 128:205 (1982).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Lanzalaco
    • 1
  • M. Coyle
    • 1
  • S. Gaur
    • 1
  • T. P. Binette
    • 1
  • T. S. Herman
    • 1
  • G. Sufrin
    • 1
  • G. H. Nancollas
    • 2
  1. 1.Depts. of Chemistry and UrologyState University of New York at BuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Administration Medical CenterBuffaloUSA

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