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The Effect of an Increased Intake of Various Constituents of a High Animal Protein Diet on the Risk of Calcium Oxalate Stone Formation in Men

  • B. Arora
  • P. L. Selby
  • R. W. Norman
  • M. Peacock
  • W. G. Robertson

Abstract

The prevalence of calcium oxalate stone disease is rising in affluent societies1. The major dietary changes in these societies shown so far are a high consumption of animal protein2, sugar3 and depletion of fibre4. Analysis of the diets of various population groups has shown that the factor which correlates best with affluence and stone disease is a high consumption of animal protein2. Animal protein contains a higher amount of certain amino acids, and is associated with a higher fat5 and purine content in the diet than vegetable protein. The objective of this investigation is to study the biochemical changes produced by increasing the consumption of these constituents and to assess the effect of these changes on the risk of stone formation.

Keywords

Uric Acid Stone Formation Animal Protein Vegetable Protein Tubular Reabsorption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Arora
    • 1
  • P. L. Selby
    • 1
  • R. W. Norman
    • 1
  • M. Peacock
    • 1
  • W. G. Robertson
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Mineral Metabolism UnitThe General InfirmaryLeedsUK

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