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Nutrition and Calcium Oxalate Urolithiasis

  • R. A. J. Conyers
  • A. M. Rofe
  • W. Bais

Abstract

In affluent societies urolithiasis is a major cause of morbidity and calcium oxalate is a major constituent in over 70% of the stones examined1. Our data confirm this figure2. Much attention has been paid to the role of calcium but a number of investigators now consider oxalate excretion to be the most critical factor in urine for determining the risk of formation of calcium oxalate stones3. Diet has traditionally been viewed as the major source of oxalate for the formation of urinary tract stones but, in more recent times, it has become accepted that approximately 90% of the oxalate appearing in urine comes from endogenous sources1. Two possible dietary sources of endogenous oxalate are refined carbohydrates and animal proteins4–6.

Keywords

Calcium Oxalate Test Diet Oxalate Excretion Sucrose Diet Oxalate Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. J. Conyers
    • 1
  • A. M. Rofe
    • 1
  • W. Bais
    • 1
  1. 1.Metabolic Research Group, Division of Clinical ChemistryInstitute of Medical and Veterinary ScienceAdelaideAustralia

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