Advertisement

Dissolution of Phosphate Stones by Percutaneous Nephrostomy and Local Irrigation

  • P. Froeling
  • C. Boetes
  • S. Strijk
Conference paper

Abstract

A high urine pH plays a critical role in the origin and growth of phosphate-containing calculi. Conversely, phosphate stones may be dissolved in more acid solutions. In 1943, Suby and Albright1 reported the dissolution of phosphatic calculi in situ by the retrograde introduction of a citrate solution containing magnesium (Suby’s solution or Solution G). Chemolysis of renal calculi by local irrigation has been used as postoperative adjuvant treatment but may also be considered as an alternative to the surgical removal of the stones, especially in patients who are poor surgical risks or when surgical removal is no longer possible2.

Keywords

Percutaneous Nephrostomy Irrigation Period Irrigation Fluid Urinary Tract Obstruction Positive Urine Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    H. I. Suby and F. Albright, New Engl. J. Med. 288:81 (1943).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    S. P. Dretler, R. C. Pfister, and J. H. Newhouse, New Engl. J. Med. 300:341 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    S. Hellsten, J. Hildel, P. Link, and U. Ulmsten, Eur. Urol. 4:282 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    D. P. Stables, N. J. Ginsberg, and M. L. Johnson, Am. J. Roentgenol. 130:75 (1978).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Froeling
    • 1
  • C. Boetes
    • 1
  • S. Strijk
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Internal Medicine (Division of General Internal Medicine), and Diagnostic RadiologySt. Radboud University HospitalNijmegenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations