Advertisement

The Staffing Conference in Pediatric Oncology

  • Jan van Eys
  • Donna R. Copeland
Part of the The Downstate Series of Research in Psychiatry and Psychology book series (DSRPP, volume 5)

Abstract

Cancer in children is a very different reality now from what it was only a few decades ago. Instead of cancer being an invariably fatal disease, it is now a disease in which biological cure is the norm. The long-term survival rate varies among cancers, but the overall cure rate approximates 60%. One in 600 children between birth and 15 years of age acquires some form of neoplastic disease (Young and Miller, 1975). Therefore, in approximately 10 years, one in 1000 individuals reaching the age of 20 will be a survivor of childhood cancer and its therapy (Meadows, Krejmas, and Belasco, 1980). We must, therefore, be concerned not only with effective therapy but also with the effects of our therapy. There is a significant medical cost of cure and that cost should be taken into consideration in designing new therapies. However, there is also a documentable psychological cost of cure (Zwartes, 1980).

Keywords

Childhood Cancer Pediatric Oncology Vocational Rehabilitation Handicapped Child Therapeutic Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cairus, N. N., Clark, G. M., Black, J., and Lansky, S. B. Childhood cancer. Nonmedical costs of the illness. Cancer, 1979, 43:403–408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Deasy-Spinetta, P. The school and the child with cancer. In: J. J. Spinetta, and P. Deasy-Spinetta (Eds.) Living with Childhood Cancer. St. Louis: C. V. Mosby Col, 1981, pp. 153–168.Google Scholar
  3. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Proposed Rules—Education of Handicapped Children and Incentive Grants Program. Federal Register, No. 252. Thursday, December 30, 1970, Vol. 41: 56986, paragraph 1219, 223 and 224.Google Scholar
  4. Department of Special Education: Parent and Student Rights for a Special Education. Texas Education Agency, Austin, Texas, April, 1980, p. 4, 5.Google Scholar
  5. Dunn, L. M. Special education for the mildly retarded—Is much of it justified? Exceptional Children, 1968, 35:5–22.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Education of the Handicapped Act, 20 U. S. C, 821, 88 Stat. 484, 1974.Google Scholar
  7. Education for All Handicapped Children Act, 20 U. S. C. 1401, 1975.Google Scholar
  8. Harris, B., and Stripling, S. The patient on the receiving end, out of control. Cancer Bulletin, 1980, 32:20–21.Google Scholar
  9. Holt, J. The right of children to informed consent. In: J. van Eys (Ed.) Research on Children. Medical Imperatives, Ethical Quandaries, and Legal Constraints. Baltimore, University Park Press, 1978, pp. 5–16.Google Scholar
  10. Kalinowski, S. Learning in adversity. In: J. van Eys (Ed.) The Normally Sick Child. Baltimore: University Park Press, 1979, pp. 37–44.Google Scholar
  11. Meadows, A. T., Krejmas, N. L., and Belasco, J. B. The medical cost of cure: Sequelae in survivors of childhood cancer. In: J. van Eys and M. P. Sullivan (Eds.) Status of the Curability of Childhood Cancers. New York: Raven Press, 1980, pp. 263–276.Google Scholar
  12. Mills vs. Board of Education of District of Columbia, 348 F Supp. 866 (D.D.C. 1972).Google Scholar
  13. van Eys, J. “What do we mean by ‘the truly cured child’”? In: J. van Eys (Ed.) The Truly Cured Child. Baltimore: University Park Press, 1977a, pp. 79–98.Google Scholar
  14. van Eys, J. Preface. In: J. van Eys (Ed.) Research on Children. Medical Imperatives, Ethical Quandaries, and Legal Constraints. Baltimore: University Park Press, 1978, pp. ix–x.Google Scholar
  15. van Eys, J. The normally sick child. In: J. van Eys (Ed.) The Normally Sick Child. Baltimore, University Park Press, 1979b, pp. 9–27.Google Scholar
  16. van Eys, J. Cure and health, the role of psychology in pediatric cancer care. In: N. Kobayashi (Ed.) Recent Advances in Managements of Children with Cancer. The Children’s Cancer Association of Japan, Tokyo, 1980, pp. 319–326.Google Scholar
  17. van Eys, J. The truly cured child. The realistic and necessary goal in pediatric oncology. In: J. J, Spinetta and P. Deasy-Spinetta (Eds.) Living with Childhood Cancer. St. Louis: C. V. Mosby Co., 1981, pp. 30–40.Google Scholar
  18. Vocational Rehabilitation Act, 29 U.S.C. 794 (1973). The White House Conference on Handicapped Individuals, Volume II. Final Report, Part C. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, p. 283 (1977).Google Scholar
  19. Weisman, A. D. and Kastenbaum, R. The psychological autopsy. Committee Mental Health Journal Monograph No. 4. New York: Behavioral Publications, 1968, pp. 1–59.Google Scholar
  20. Young, J. L. and Miller, R. W. Incidence of malignant tumors in U. S. Children. Journal of Pediatrics, 1975, 86:254–258.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Zwartjes, W. J. Education of the Child with Cancer. National Conference on the Care of the Child with Cancer, American Cancer Society, Inc., New York, 1979, pp. 150–155.Google Scholar
  22. Zwartjes, W. J. The psychological costs of curing the child with cancer. In: J. van Eys and M. P. Sullivan (Eds.) Status of the Curability of Childhood Cancers. New York: Raven Press, 1980, pp. 277–284.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan van Eys
    • 1
  • Donna R. Copeland
    • 1
  1. 1.Tumor InstituteM. D. Anderson HospitalHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations