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Coping with Survivorship in Childhood Cancer: Family Problems

  • Gerald P. Koocher
Part of the The Downstate Series of Research in Psychiatry and Psychology book series (DSRPP, volume 5)

Abstract

The death of a family member exerts a powerful psychological impact on those who survive. But what of the family member who “might die” and then does not? The concept of “anticipatory grief” is well known to those who work with cancer patients and their families (Futterman and Hoffman, 1973), but the impact of a threatened loss which does not come to pass presents a rather different set of problems (Kemler, 1981).

Keywords

Childhood Cancer Social Adjustment Adjustment Problem Psychosocial Adjustment Survive Childhood Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald P. Koocher
    • 1
  1. 1.Sidney Farber Cancer InstituteBostonUSA

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