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Neurophysiological Properties of Visual Neurons in Rats with Light Damaged Retinas

  • Kenneth V. Anderson
  • Vance Lemmon
  • W. Keith O’Steen

Abstract

In recent years it has been shown by a number of investigators that the photoreceptors in albino rats undergo an irreversible degeneration as a result of long-term exposure to continuous illumination. In fact, by adjusting the intensity of the light source and varying the spectral properties of the light, it has been shown that the retinal degeneration can be experimentally graded in both amount and spatial extent (1–8). In our laboratory we have been interested in the perceptual and neurophysiological implications of light-induced retinal degeneration. Accordingly, we have pursued a broad program of research to help clarify the relationship between light-induced retinal degeneration and visually-guided behavior and to relate retinal and perceptual changes to alterations in the response properties of neurons in various portions of the visual system.

Keywords

Receptive Field Lateral Geniculate Nucleus Optic Tract Retinal Degeneration Constant Light 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth V. Anderson
    • 1
  • Vance Lemmon
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. Keith O’Steen
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyEmory UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsWashington UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Department of AnatomyBowman Gray School of MedicineUSA

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