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The Avoidance of Stationary and Moving Obstacles by Little Brown Bats, Myotis lucifugus

  • Philip H.-S. Jen
  • Yung H. Lee
  • R. Kelman Wieder
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (volume 28)

Abstract

Echolocating bats sense their environments by emitting ultrasonic signals and listening to the echoes. The simplest way to measure this ability is by the obstacle-avoidance test in which a bat flies through an array of stationary wires and the numbers of hits and misses are recorded. By extending this test and making their bats fly between both stationary and moving obstacles, Jen and McCarty (1978) reported that bets avoid moving objects more successfully than stationary ones. Using the same experimental method and more bats, we report here more quantitative data on the sensitivity of the echolocation system of bats.

Keywords

Early Summer Early Fall Wooden Panel Stationary Obstacle Nylon Monofilament 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Jen, P.H.-S., and McCarty, J.K., 1978, Nature, 275:743–744.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Johnson, C. G., 1969, “Migration and dispersal of insects by flight”, Methuan, London.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip H.-S. Jen
  • Yung H. Lee
  • R. Kelman Wieder

There are no affiliations available

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