Auditory Processing of Echoes: Peripheral Processing

  • Gerhard Neuweiler
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (volume 28)

Abstract

In mammals sounds hitting the ear release a travelling wave on the Basilar Membrane (BM). The BM acts as a bank of mechanical low pass filters where high sound frequencies produce a maximal wave amplitude in the basal part of the BM and low ones in the apical region. The place of maximal vibration is considered the site of the BM where that frequency is represented. From base to apex the width of the BM gradually increases and the thickness decreases resulting in a continuous decline of the stiffness of the BM which correlates to the frequency representation along the course of the BM. From base to apex gradually lower frequencies are represented, each octave covering an equal distance on the BM.

Keywords

Attenuation Hunt Azimuth Dition Dium 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerhard Neuweiler
    • 1
  1. 1.Zoologisches InstitutJ.W.Goethe-UniversitätFrankfurtGermany

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