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The Significance of Pesticide Contaminants

  • J. R. Plimmer
Part of the Progress in Analytical Chemistry book series (PAC)

Abstract

Pesticide manufacture normally yields a crude synthetic product which can be purified or refined to a specified content of the active ingredient. The major concern of the analyst is to define the amount of active ingredient present in formulations or batches of technical material from the plant. Contaminants have rarely given cause for concern, since biological testing with technical material might be expected to reveal the presence of impurities with significantly different properties from the active compound. For example, the selectivity of the herbicide amiben (3-amino-2, 5-dichlorobenzoic acid), is reduced by the presence of 2,5-dichloro-6-nitrobenzoic acid or 6-amino-2,5-dichlorobenzoic acid and crops are damaged by these compounds. Because these two compounds possess undesirable biological activity, they must be removed by rigorous control of the manfacturing process (H. Segal, 1967).

Keywords

Chlorinate Phenol Dioxin Contamination Sodium Chloroaceta Commercial Fatty Acid Dioxin Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Plimmer
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Science Research Division, U.S. Department of AgriculturalAgricultural Research ServiceBeltsvilleUSA

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