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Human Trace Metal Burdens

  • Gwyneth Howells
Part of the Progress in Analytical Chemistry book series (PAC)

Abstract

There is a long-standing interest in the composition of man, for a variety of reasons. One, of course, is a natural curiosity and an intuition that the nature of man might be revealed by his composition. This concept has been rationalised to conceive that it might be possible to identify cultural, ethnic or environmental differences between communities or population groups. Another reason for an interest in tissue composition or “body burden” has been the association of some specific diseases or physiological manifestations in man with perturbations of tissue concentrations from the “normal”.

Keywords

Body Burden Radioactive Nuclide Family Food Metal Burden Physiological Manifestation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gwyneth Howells
    • 1
  1. 1.Natural Environment Research CouncilLondonUK

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