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Analytical Techniques for the Detection of Nutrient Anions, Phosphates and Nitrates in the Water Environment

  • Leonard L. Ciaccio
Part of the Progress in Analytical Chemistry book series (PAC)

Abstract

Eutrophication refers to the natural aging processes of lakes. It carries two connotations: The increase in nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates leads to a greater biological productivity and eventually the conversion of a lake to dry land. The effects of eutrophication cause changes in plant and animal species present in the water body, which may be objectionable. The former development as a natural process is long term, although man!s activities may greatly increase its rate of attainment. The latter result, however, is the undesirable effects, which may be the appearance of algal blooms and the loss of desirable fish species leading to destruction of recreational and drinking water resources (1). Nutrients and phosphates are responsible for algal blooms and their measurement in natural waters is important. The degradation and aging of rivers and streams, although not universally referred to as eutrophication, is considered a somewhat allied process and nutrients play a similar role as in the eutrophication of lakes and ponds (1).

Keywords

Organic Nitrogen Organic Phosphorus Stannous Chloride Phosphorus Compound Nitrogenous Substance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard L. Ciaccio
    • 1
  1. 1.GTE Laboratories Inc.BaysideUSA

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