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Cholesterol Biosynthesis in Liver Tissue

  • Mary E. Dempsey
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 13)

Abstract

Most of the early stages of cholesterol biosynthesis in liver tissue are now well defined with regard to control sites, intermediates, and specific enzymes (e.g. (1)). In contrast much basic information is still to be obtained for the stages of cholesterol biosynthesis after squalene cyclization. The purpose of this report is to review recent findings in our laboratory which elucidate mechanisms of liver enzymes catalyzing conversion of squalene and sterol intermediates to cholesterol. In particular, we identified a liver protein which functions uniquely as carrier for water insoluble precursors during cholesterol biosynthesis. This protein is designated squalene and sterol carrier protein or SCP. In this report we describe the properties of SCP; its role as activator of reactions catalyzed by microsomal enzymes; its specificity; and the inhibition of its binding and activation functions by inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis.

Keywords

Bile Acid Liver Tissue Cholesterol Biosynthesis Microsomal Enzyme Liver Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary E. Dempsey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry, Medical SchoolUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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