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Abstract

Mus musculus (n=19 + X + Y) The house mouse has emerged as the laboratory animal par excellence for mammalian genetics. The main reason for this is technical but there is also the fact that the mouse ‘got in first’ in those early days when the variations present in fanciers’ stocks were eagerly exploited for confirmation and extension of Mendelian inheritance. This early lead has never been lost and the accumulative information on the species is now so extensive that no other mammalian species is likely to supplant it. This is not to imply that the house mouse is ideal for all types of research, nor that the comparative genetics of other species should be neglected. Far from it in fact. Excessive concentration on one species is to be deplored.

Keywords

Linkage Group House Mouse Chiasma Frequency Differential Segment Female Heterozygote 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Roy Robinson

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