Advertisement

Comparison of Exposure Assessment Guidelines for Pesticides

  • P. Curry
  • S. Iyengar
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 129)

Abstract

Exposure assessment for individuals occupationally exposed to pesticides is an essential component of the risk assessment process for a pesticide. One common approach for estimating occupational and bystander exposure involves exposure studies with individuals handling and applying pesticides under actual use conditions. There are a number of scenarios under which pesticides are used. Broadly, they can be divided into areas of agricultural, forestry, industrial/commercial, and domestic use. The more common outdoor scenarios include use in agriculture, forestry, rights of way and golf courses, whereas common indoor uses include greenhouses, offices, homes, and restaurants.

Keywords

Exposure Assessment Biological Monitoring Surrogate Data Exposure Study Dermal Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Biologische Bundesanstalt fur Land-und Forstwirtschaft (1988) Richtlinien fur die amtliche Prufung von Pflanzenschutzmitteln, Tiel 1, 3–3/1, April.Google Scholar
  2. B.C. Research (1988) Assessment of bystander exposure to chlorpyrifos in indoor environments. Rept to HWC, Pesticides Div, Ottawa, Ontario.Google Scholar
  3. Durham WF, Wolfe HR (1962) Measurement of the exposure of workers to pesticides. Bull WHO 26: 75–91.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Fenske RA, Leffingwell JT, Spear RC (1986a) A video imaging technique for assessing dermal exposure—I Instrument design and testing. Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 47: 764–770.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Fenske RA, Wong SM, Leffingwell JT, Spear RC (1986b) A video imaging technique for assessing dermal exposure—II Fluorescent tracer testing. Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 47: 771–775.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Fenske RA, Curry PB, Wandelmaier FW, Ritter L (1991) Development of dermal and respiratory sampling procedures for human exposure to pesticides in indoor environments. J Expos Anal Environ Epidemiol 1: 11–30.Google Scholar
  7. Groupement International des Associations Nationales de Fabricants de Produits (1990) Monitoring studies in the assessment of field worker exposure to pesticides. GI-FAP Tech Mono 14, Brussels, Belgium.Google Scholar
  8. Health and Welfare Canada (HWC) (1992) Guidelines for indoor occupant exposure assessment for pesticides. Workplace Substances and Pesticides Div, Ottawa, Ontario (unpublished).Google Scholar
  9. Kahn E (1979) Outline guide for performance of field studies to establish safe reentry intervals for organophosphate pesticides. Residue Reviews 70: 27–43.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Mull R, McCarthy JF (1986) Guidelines for conducting mixer/loader-applicator studies. Vet Hum Toxicol 28 (4): 328–336.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Naffziger DH, Sprenkel RJ, Mattler MP (1985) Indoor environmental monitoring of Dursban L.O. following broadcast application. In: Down to earth ( 41 ). Dow Chemical Comp, Midland, MI.Google Scholar
  12. National Agricultural Chemicals Association (NACA) (1988) Guidelines for conducting biological monitoring applicator exposure studies (unpublished), Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  13. National Agricultural Chemicals Association (NACA) (1990) Guidelines for conducting indoor occupant exposure studies. Ad hoc Committee on Indoor Exposure (unpublished), Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  14. Popendorf WJ (1976) An industrial hygiene investigation into the occupational hazard of parathion residues to citrus harvesters. PhD dins, Univ Calif, Berkley.Google Scholar
  15. U.S. EPA (1984) Pesticide assessment guidelines subdivision Kexposure: Reentryprotection. Adams JD. EPA 540/9–84–001, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  16. U.S. EPA (1987) Pesticide assessment guidelines subdivision Uapplicator exposure monitoring. EPA PB87–133286, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  17. World Health Organization (WHO) (1975) Survey of exposure to organophosphorous pesticides in agriculture: Standard protocol. VBC/75. 9, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
  18. World Health Organization (1982) Field surveys of exposure to pesticides: Standard protocol. GIFAP Tech Mono 7, VBC/82. 1, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
  19. World Health Organization (1986) Field surveys of exposure to pesticides standard protocol. Toxicol Lett 33: 223–235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Curry
    • 1
  • S. Iyengar
    • 1
  1. 1.Workplace Substances and Pesticides DivisionEnvironmental Health Directorate, Health and Welfare CanadaOttawaCanada

Personalised recommendations