Advertisement

Pesticide Protective Clothing

  • Elizabeth P. Easter
  • Herbert N. Nigg
Conference paper
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 129)

Abstract

The use of pesticides in the United States has grown 10-fold in the past three decades, and it continues to grow. The dilemma of using pesticides is that “they protect crops from insects, weeds, disease and hunger, but they are also associated with hazards ranging from acute toxicity to cumulative effects such as cancer, birth defects, genetic mutations and sterility” (Boraiko 1980).

Keywords

Nonwoven Fabric Methyl Parathion Protective Clothing Dermal Exposure Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. ASTM (1990) Standards on protective clothing ASTM, Committee F-23, Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
  2. Bodden M, Cioffi J, Fone V, McLaughlin M, Russel S (1983) Summary of research on protective materials for agricultural pesticide use. MTR-82W 179, Mitre Corp, Metrek Div, McLean, VA.Google Scholar
  3. Boraiko AA (1980) The pesticide dilemma. Nat Geographic 2: 145–183.Google Scholar
  4. Branson DH, Sweeney M (1991) Pesticide personal protective clothing, Rev Environ Contam Toxicol 122: 81–109.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cowan, SL (1991) Statistical model for predicting protective clothing preferences from subjective measures of comfort. Abstract Booklet: Fourth International Symposium on the Performance of Protective Clothing: Challenges for Developing Protective Clothing for the 1990s and Beyond. Sponsored by: ASTM Committee F-23, June 18–20, 1991, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, p 56.Google Scholar
  6. Crossmore, DG, Obendorf, SK (1991) Pesticide protection through layered clothing systems. Abstract Booklet: Fourth International Symposium on the Performance of Protective Clothing: Challenges for Developing Protective Clothing for the 1990s and Beyond. Sponsored by: ASTM Committee F-23, June 18–20, 1991. Montreal, Quebec, Canada, p 87.Google Scholar
  7. Crouse JL, DeJonge JO, Calogero F (1990) Pesticide barrier performance of selected nonwoven fabrics in laboratory capillary and pressure penetration testing. Text Res J 90: 137–142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Dimit CA, Easter EP, DeJonge JO (1991) The effect of seams and closures on pesticide penetration through fabrics. In: Abstracts 4th Internat Symp Performance of Protective Clothing: Challenges for Developing Protective Clothing for the 1990s and Beyond. ASTM Committee F-23, June 18–20, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, p 58.Google Scholar
  9. Durham WJ, Wolfe HR (1962) Measurement of the exposure of workers to pesticides. Bull Wld Hlth Org 26: 75–91.Google Scholar
  10. Federal Register (1974) 39:16888–16891.Google Scholar
  11. Federal Register (1984) 49:32605, Aug. 15.Google Scholar
  12. Federal Register (1988a) 53(141):27717–27718.Google Scholar
  13. Federal Register (1988b) 40 CFR Part 170, 53(131):25970–26021.Google Scholar
  14. Federal Register (1991) 56(115), June 14.Google Scholar
  15. Fenske RA, Blacker AM, Hamburger SJ, Simon GS (1990) Worker exposure and protective clothing performance during manual seed treatment with lindane. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 19: 190–196.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Laughlin J (1986) Textiles and refurbishment: A human resource perspective. In: Deacon RE, Huffman WE (eds) Human resources research, 1887–1987 proc. Iowa State Univ, Ames, pp 61–73.Google Scholar
  17. Leonas KK (1991 a) The mechanism of pesticide transmission through apparel fabrics: A comparison of drop and spray exposure methodologies. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 20: 427–431.Google Scholar
  18. Leonas KK (199lb) Effect of pesticide formulation on transmission: A comparison of three formulations. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 46: 697–704.Google Scholar
  19. Nigg HN, Stamper JH, Easter EP, Mahon WD, DeJonge JO (1990) Protection afforded citrus pesticide applicators by coveralls. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 19: 635–639.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Obendorf SK, Kasunick RS, Ravichandran V, Borsa J, Coffman CW (1991) Starch as a renewable finish to improve the pesticide-protective properties of conventional workclothes. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 20: 10–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Raheel M (1991a) Pesticide transmission in fabrics: Effect of particulate soil. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 46: 845–851.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Raheel M (199lb) Pesticide transmission in fabrics: Effect of perspiration. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 46: 837–844.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Serat WF, Van Loon AJ, Serat WH (1982) Loss of pesticides from patches used in the field as pesticide collectors. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 11: 227–234.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Shaw A, Hill KR (1990) Variability of sorption of diazinon through microporous fabrics. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 45: 500–506.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Shaw A, Hill KR (1991) Effect of exposure time on the sorption of pesticide emulsifiable concentrates through microporous fabric. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 46: 45–52.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. U.S. Department of Labor (1991) Federal research on chemical protective clothing and equipment, a summary of federal programs of fiscal year 1989. OSHA, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  27. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Extension Service (1991a) Avoiding heat stress. USDA, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  28. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Extension Service (1991b) Choosing chemical-resistant PPE. USDA, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  29. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Extension Service (1991c) Clothing layers for added protection. USDA, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  30. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Extension Service (1991d) Coveralls, gloves, and other skin protection. USDA, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  31. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Extension Service (199le) Inspecting, maintaining, and replacing PPE. USDA, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  32. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Extension Service (1991f) Protective eyewear. USDA, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  33. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Extension Service (1991g) Respirators. USDA, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  34. Wadsworth LC, Balasurbramanian V, Lin YQ (1990) A study of the uniformity of nonwoven fabrics and their repellency and barrier performance characteristics. In: Internat Nonwovens Conf. TAPPI Proceedings, Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry, Marco Island, FL, pp 165–176.Google Scholar
  35. Wolfe HR, Durham WF, Armstrong JF (1967) Exposure of workers to pesticides. Arch Environ Hlth 14: 622–632.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth P. Easter
    • 1
  • Herbert N. Nigg
    • 2
  1. 1.Human Environment: TextilesUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  2. 2.IFAS, Citrus Research and Education CenterUniversity of FloridaLake AlfredUSA

Personalised recommendations