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Abstract

Barium salts are used for a number of purposes, including drilling mud (Kirkpatrick 1978), as a pigment (Miner 1969), and as x-ray contrast medium (Miner 1969). Other uses are summarized by Pidgeon (1964). The properties of barium and its salts are unique to the specific compound. For the structures and properties of barium, barium chloride, and barium sulfate (also known as barite), see Tables 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

Keywords

Uncertainty Factor Barium Sulfate Barium Chloride Threshold Limit Value Lime Softening 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • George W. Ware
    • 1
  1. 1.College of AgricultureUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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