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Monocrotophos — Environmental Fate and Toxicity

  • Johann A. Guth
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 139)

Abstract

Monocrotophos (C1414, SD 9129), the active ingredient (a.i.) of Nuvacron® (trademark of Ciba-Geigy) and of Azodrin® (trademark of Shell), is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide with systemic, residual, and contact activity against a wide range of sucking and chewing insects and mites. It is registered for more than 20 crops in over 50 countries and is extremely well tolerated in all crops for which its use is recommended. Cotton is the most important crop, followed by soybeans and rice. In addition, monocrotophos is also used in wheat, potatoes, groundnuts, maize, sugarcane, tobacco, and some vegetables. Application rates for the different uses vary and range from 150 to 1200 g ha-1. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize research information regarding the environmental fate and toxicity of monocrotophos. The published scientific literature forms the primary source, but results from proprietary, industrial research reports are also included.

Keywords

Japanese Quail Acute Oral Toxicity Dead Bird Oral Intubation Paddy Water 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johann A. Guth
    • 1
  1. 1.Crop Protection DivisionCiba-Geigy LimitedBaselSwitzerland

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