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Pesticide Use and Regulation in Cyprus

  • I. D. Melifronides
  • A. Kashouli-Kouppari
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 134)

Abstract

Pesticides provided man with powerful weapons against insect pests, diseases, and weeds, thus resulting in large economic and health benefits to society. Their use enhances and stabilizes crop yield, protects the nutritional integrity of food, facilitates storage to assure year-round supplies, and provides for attractive and appealing food products. In 1963, Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring emphasized the potential environmental hazards associated with the use of pesticides. This has led to much greater emphasis being placed on integrated pest management in recent years, but the use of pesticides still continues to be worldwide the major and most effective means of pest control. According to a report published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (Aspelin et al. 1992), worldwide 2.53 million metric tonnes of pesticides were used in 1991. Economic estimates of pesticides benefits are either highly aggregate or specific to one crop and chemical. A widely quoted estimate is that 40010 of the world’s food supply would be at risk without pesticides (Pimental et al. 1978).

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Pesticide Residue Integrate Pest Management European Economic Community Agricultural Pesticide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. D. Melifronides
    • 1
  • A. Kashouli-Kouppari
    • 1
  1. 1.Analytical Laboratories SectionDepartment of AgricultureNicosiaCyprus

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