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The Romance of Plant Breeding and Other Myths

  • Donald N. Duvick
Part of the Stadler Genetics Symposia Series book series (SGSS)

Abstract

Myths are essential to human existence. They give meaning to life, inspiration and strength for the daily struggle. They often express profound truths, embedded in elements of fantasy. Everyone deeply believes in some myths, while deprecating others as dangerous falsehoods. The origins of myths usually are unknown, but probably they are inspired by dramatic events, clearly important to those who first noted them, but with cause and effect imperfectly understood.

Keywords

Plant Breeder Wild Relative Erucic Acid Maize Hybrid Maize Breeder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald N. Duvick
    • 1
  1. 1.Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.Des MoinesUSA

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