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Serology and Immunochemistry

  • Renate Koenig
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

Serological techniques are among the most efficient means for the identification and characterization of plant viruses and their associated proteins. Techniques and tools that have proved to be especially useful in studies with filamentous plant viruses are listed in Table I together with the major areas of their present and anticipated applications. Those aspects which are especially important in studies with filamentous viruses will be discussed in Section II. As world-wide efforts continue to improve the sensitivity and resolving power of serological assays, tests which were highly valued at one time may suddenly be outdated; Section III will, therefore, discuss which techniques seem to be most appropriate at the present state of knowledge to solve a certain problem. In Section IV a brief description of the serology of individual groups of viruses will be given.

Keywords

Mosaic Virus Potato Virus Plant Virus Tobacco Etch Virus Soybean Mosaic Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renate Koenig
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal Biological Research Center for Agriculture and ForestryPlant Virus InstituteBraunschweigFederal Republic of Germany

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