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Defective Interfering Rhabdoviruses

  • John J. Holland
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

This review focuses on biological and molecular properties of defective interfering (DI) particles of the rhabdoviruses, but coverage of DI particles of other RNA viruses is frequently included to emphasize common principles, significant difference, or phenomena that have not yet been observed or examined among the rhabdoviruses. Nearly all definitive studies of rhabdovirus DI particles have been carried out with the prototype rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and VSV DI particles are probably the most studied and best understood of all DI particles. Space limitations prevent complete coverage of the DI-particle field, and the reader is referred to earlier reviews for supplemental background information (Huang and Baltimore, 1977; Reichmann and Schnitzlein, 1979, 1980; Holland et al., 1980; Perrault, 1981; Lazzarini et al., 1981; Blumberg and Kolakofsky, 1983).*

Keywords

Influenza Virus West Nile Virus Newcastle Disease Virus Persistent Infection Rabies Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Holland
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of California at San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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