Sleep Disorders

  • Gerald S. Golden
Part of the Topics in Pediatrics book series (TIPE)


Sleep is a universal phenomenon in higher animals, and although the need for it is clearly recognized, its physiological purpose and the factors producing it are not understood. There is a well-defined evolution of sleep patterns in the individual, and disorders of sleep have age-specific characteristics. A rational clinical approach to complaints of disordered sleep requires understanding of the developmental aspects of normal sleep.


Obstructive Sleep Apnea Sleep Disorder NREM Sleep Central Nervous System Anomaly Hypnagogic Hallucination 


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  1. 1.
    Coons, S., and Guilleminault, C., 1982, Development of sleep—wake patterns and non-rapid eye movement sleep stages in the first six months of life in normal infants, Pediatrics 69: 793–798.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Brouilette, R. T., Fernbach, S. K., and Hunt, C. E., 1982, Obstructive sleep apnea in infants and children, J. Pediatr. 100: 31–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Lacey, D. J., 1983, Sleep EEG abnormalities in children with near-miss sudden infant death syndrome, in siblings, and in infants with recurrent apnea, J. Pediatr. 102: 854–859.Google Scholar
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    Fleming, P. J., Cade, D., Bryan, M. H., and Bryan, A. C., 1980, Congenital central hypoventilation and sleep state, Pediatrics 66: 425–428.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Additional Reading

  1. Anders, T. F., Carskaden, M. A., and Dement, W. C., 1980, Sleep and sleepiness in children and adolescents, Pediatr. Clin., North Anz. 27: 29–43.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald S. Golden
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, The Health Science CenterUniversity of Tennessee, MemphisMemphisUSA

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