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Dual-Career Family Stress and Coping

  • Denise A. Skinner
Part of the The Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

A significant influence on contemporary family living is the increasing rate of female participation in the labor force. Examination of Department of Labor statistics reveals that the married woman is the key source of this growth and helps explain the growing interest in dual-career families reflected in both the professional and popular literature. Although it is difficult to assess the number of married career women in the work force, it seems reasonable to assume that the percentage for this group is positively related to the general increase in labor force participation rates of women.12 As more and more women seek increased education and training, along with an increased demand for skilled labor and a greater awareness of sex-role equality, the dual-career life-style is likely to increase in prevalence and acceptability.21

Keywords

Coping Strategy Career Choice Coping Behavior Professional Woman Career Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise A. Skinner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human Development, Family Relations, and Community Educational ServicesUniversity of Wisconsin-StoutMenomonieUSA

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